Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture: views from Parties and observers on topic 2(a)

Actors of change: can socio-legal empowerment support rural producer agency?

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Thursday, March 07, 2019
h. 12.00 pm – 1 pm CET
Language: English

Introducer: Antonio Bombelli, IAFES Division, CMCC Foundation – Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change, Italy

Presenter: Maria Vincenza Chiriacò, IAFES Division, CMCC Foundation – Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change, Italy

Moderator: Zitouni Ould Dada, Climate and Environment Division – Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

ABSTRACT
The historic Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture (KJWA) decision, adopted at COP 23, recognizes the fundamental importance of agriculture in tackling climate change. The KJWA calls for joint work between the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advise (SABSTA) and the Subsidiary Body of Implementation (SBI) with the aim to take into consideration the vulnerabilities of agriculture to climate change and approaches to address food security.  Paragraph 2 of the KJWA decision provides a list of initial elements on which Parties and observers to the UNFCCC were invited to submit their views:  (a) Modalities for implementation of the outcomes of the five in-session workshops on issues related to agriculture and other future topics that may arise from this work;  (b) Methods and approaches for assessing adaptation, adaptation co-benefits and resilience;  (c) Improved soil carbon, soil health and soil fertility under grassland and cropland as well as integrated systems, including water management;  (d) Improved nutrient use and manure management towards sustainable and resilient agricultural systems;  (e) Improved livestock management systems;  (f) Socioeconomic and food security dimensions of climate change in the agricultural sector.  FAO in collaboration with CMCC produced a summary of the submissions provided by Parties and observers to the UNFCCC on the element 2 (a) above discussed during the SABSTA 49 (COP 24, Poland 2018). The summary aims to make the wide range of views submitted more easily accessible to all interested and to support efforts to identify a joint way forward for climate action in the agricultural sectors.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:
The seminar will be broadcasted via Go-to-Webinar.
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Rural producer agency and agricultural value chains: What role for socio-legal empowerment?

 

New public policies and changing economic fundamentals have spurred private-sector investment in commercial agriculture in low- and middle-income countries – from production to aggregation, processing and distribution. Growing numbers of policies and programmes aim to integrate small-scale rural producers into agricultural value chains, based on concepts such as ‘inclusive business’ and ‘shared value’.

But significant questions remain over how best to: recognise the possibly divergent visions, interests and constraints of various actors, and the risks and trade-offs that can arise; address often substantial power imbalances that affect value chain relations; and ultimately support genuine agency among rural producers and their communities – that is, their ability to make choices, take action and influence realities around them.

This report explores whether socio-legal empowerment – the combination of recourse to law with related change strategies such as collective action and gaining greater business savvy – might help address these issues. The report develops a conceptual framework to further understand, test and strengthen the contribution of socio-legal empowerment to enhancing the agency of rural actors as they engage with, or are affected by, commercial agriculture.

 

Download: http://pubs.iied.org/12607IIED/

 

Actors of change: can socio-legal empowerment support rural producer agency?

Growing numbers of policies and programmes aim to integrate small-scale rural producers into agricultural value chains, mobilising concepts such as ‘inclusive business’ to promote approaches whereby firms equitably include low-income groups. But significant questions remain over how best to: recognise the possibly divergent visions, interests and constraints of different actors; address often substantial power imbalances; and ultimately promote agency among rural producers and their communities — that is, their ability to choose, act and influence realities around them. Based on a review of trends in commercial agriculture and experience of supporting rural producers and communities in various countries, this briefing develops a conceptual framework to further understand, test and strengthen the contribution that socio-legal empowerment can make to enhance the agency of rural actors as they engage with, or are affected by, commercial agriculture.

Download: http://pubs.iied.org/17499IIED/

 

 


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